What’s in Bloom & Plant Hotline

Select a month below to see what's in bloom this season at the Atlanta Botanical Garden. 

What's in Bloom by Month

January

  • Dendrobium spectabile
    • Dendrobium spectabile
    • Orchidaceae
    • Orchid Display House
  • Gnetum gnemon
    • Gnetum gnemon
    • Gnetaceae
    • Tropical Rotunda
  • Japanese Camellia
    • Japanese Camellia
    • Camellia japonica ‘Little Slam’
    • Camellia japonica
    • A cultivar of horticultural origin from the species Camellia japonica from Japan. The Garden’s plant is about 8′ tall by 6′ wide, and could mature at 10′ by 10′.
  • Japanese Rice Paper Plant
    • Japanese Rice Paper Plant
    • Edgeworthia chrysantha
    • One of the many winter-flowering plants at the Atlanta Botanical Garden, Japanese Rice Paper plant is smothered with fragrant, bright yellow flowers in late January and February. Reaching a height of six feet, its large leaves lend a tropical look to the shade garden. The bark of the plant is used to make banknote paper in Japan.
  • Mahonia hybrid
    • Mahonia hybrid
    • Mahonia x media
    • Berberidaceae
    • Huge flower clusters (up to 24 inches) of bright yellow flowers top these sturdy evergreen shrubs. Great for the dry shade garden, the flowers are followed by brilliant blue fruits.
  • Rosy Periwinkle
    • Rosy Periwinkle
    • Catharanthus roseus
    • Apocynaceae
    • Source of alkaloids (vincristine and vinblastine) used in the treatment of some forms of leukemia such as Hodgkin’s Disease
    • Desert House

February

  • Cattleya amethystoglossa
    • Cattleya amethystoglossa
    • Orchidaceae
    • Orchid Display House
  • Japanese Pussy Willow
    • Japanese Pussy Willow
    • Salix chaenomeloides
    • Salicaceae
    • Trustees Garden
  • Nun’s Orchid
    • Nun’s Orchid
    • Phaius tankervillae
    • Orchidaceae
    • Orchid Display House
  • Schomburgkia splendida
    • Schomburgkia splendida
    • Salicaceae
    • Orchid Display House
  • Witchhazel
    • Witchhazel
    • Hamamelis mollis ‘Pallida’
    • Hamamelidaceae
    • These large, deciduous shrubs brighten the winter landscape with their yellow fragrant flowers. This is an Asian relative of our native Hamamelis, which was used to produce witchhazel, an astringent.
  • Yulan Magnolia
    • Yulan Magnolia
    • Magnolia denudate
    • Mgnoliaceae
    • A large, upright, deciduous tree with white flowers in late winter/early spring. Flowers can handle cold temperatures well, unlike some other early-flowering magnolias.

March

  • Algerian Iris
    • Algerian Iris
    • Iris ungicularis
    • Iridaceae
    • Iris unguicularis is a beardless iris that blooms from late fall through late winter and is hardy to zone 7. The flowers are typically a medium lavender-blue, with yellow to orange markings on the falls; but variation does occur.
  • Daffodil
    • Daffodil
    • Narcissus ‘Minnow’
    • Amaryllidaceae
    • Three to five fragrant, yellow and white flowers per stem make this diminutive daffodil stand out. Miniature daffodils typically stay six inches tall or less. Relatively pest and deer resistant, Narcissus add exuberant color in early spring.
  • Desert Rose
    • Desert Rose
    • Adenium obesum
    • Apocynaceae
    • Desert House
  • Flowering Crabapple
    • Flowering Crabapple
    • Malus x ‘Robinson’
    • Roseaceae
    • ‘Robinson’ is a fast-growing crabapple cultivar with good disease resistance. The leaves emerge bronze then turn green, and is prolific in spring with pink flowers. Birds love the bright red fruit that matures in fall.
  • Paperbush
    • Paperbush
    • Edgeworthia papyrifera
    • Thymelaeacea
    • A deciduous, small, suckering shrub with nice blue-green foliage. Likes moist, well-drained soils and semi-shady locations. Winter flowers, yellowish-white, extending into March.
  • Winterhazel
    • Winterhazel
    • Corylopsis pauciflora
    • Hamamelidaceae
    •  Winterhazel forms a delicate, small shrub that reaches four to five feet and is covered with pale yellow flowers in March.

April

  • Apple
    • Apple
    • Malus x domestica
    • Rosaceae
    • Early April apple trees burst forth with 1-inch flowers that resemble pinkish white fluffy cotton candy. Once pollinated the flowers quickly drop and apples start to develop. They’ll grow all summer and mature in late September, early October. The apple trees in the edible garden include: ‘Gala’, ‘Liberty’, ‘Golden Delicious’, ‘Arkansas Black’ and ‘Mollie’s Delicious’.
  • Cavendishia micayensis
    • Cavendishia micayensis
    • Ericaceae
    • High Elevation House
  • Crown of Thorns
    • Crown of Thorns
    • Euphorbia milii
    • Euphorbiacaea
    • A Madagascar native with flowers that range in color from yellow to pink to red. These spiny plants have a poisonous milky white sap inside the leaves and stems.
  • Dendrobium fimbriatum var. oculatum
    • Dendrobium fimbriatum var. oculatum
    • Orchidaceae
    • Orchid Display House
  • Jade Vine Emerald Creeper
    • Jade Vine Emerald Creeper
    • Strongylodon macrobotrys
    • Fabaceae
    • Tropical Rotunda
  • Woolly Groundsel
    • Woolly Groundsel
    • Packera tomentosa
    • Asteraceae
    • Conservation Gardens

May

  • Blue False Indigo
    • Blue False Indigo
    • Baptisia australis
    • This native perennial adds structure to the early spring.
  • Bromeliad
    • Bromeliad
    • Tillandsia dyeriana
    • Bromeliaceae
    • Tropical Rotunda
  • Georgia Plume
    • Georgia Plume
    • Elliottia racemosa
    • Ericaceae
    • Conservation Gardens
  • Hoya
    • Hoya
    • Hoya acuta
    • Asclepiadaceae
    • Tropical Rotunda
  • Hybrid Musk Rose
    • Hybrid Musk Rose
    • Rosa ‘Buff Beauty’
    • Introduced in 1939, the ‘Buff Beauty’ is a gorgeous apricot-colored rose which blooms repeatedly all summer. It is resistant to disease and its blooms tend to hold color better than other similarly colored roses. It can grow up to five feet tall and eight feet wide.
  • Hydrangea
    • Hydrangea
    • Hydrangea s. ‘Maiko’
    • This lovely hydrangea forms a small-mounding, three-foot plant and is smothered with four-inch mophead flowers that begin white and age to pink. It is the perfect size for any small-space garden. The Hydrangea collection at the Atlanta Botanical Garden peaks from late May through August.

June

  • Climbing Noisette Rose
    • Climbing Noisette Rose
    • Rosa ‘Crepuscule’
    • Rosaceae
    • Crepuscule means ‘twilight’ in French, which eloquently describes the color of the flowers. Blooms intermittently all season long, robust and well suited to the Southeast. Look for these beauties climbing on the arbors in the Rose Garden.
  • Dwarf Pomegranate
    • Dwarf Pomegranate
    • Punica granatum var. nana
    • Lythraceae
    • This dwarf shrub catches the attention of every visitor that passes by. It has fiery orange flowers that bloom prolifically all summer long and mature into edible pomegranates. The ripe fruits are about 2 inches in diameter.
    • Edible Garden
  • Hardy Gladiolus
    • Hardy Gladiolus
    • Gladiolus tubergenii ‘Charm’
    • Iridaceae
    • Beautiful, vivid pink spikes grow 30 to 36 inches tall, and they are ideal for cut arrangements. Look for these gorgeous blooms in the Rose Garden.
  • Jungle Geranium
    • Jungle Geranium
    • Ixora coccinea
    • Rubiaceae
    • Tropical Rotunda
  • Rain Lily
    • Rain Lily
    • Zephyranthes sp.
    • Our collection of these summer bulbs begins blooming this month as summer thunderstorms begin. With flower colors ranging from white to pink to yellow, clumps are a pleasant surprise to visitors exploring perennial borders.
  • Uncarina
    • Uncarina
    • Uncarina grandidieri
    • Pedaliaceae
    • Desert House

July

  • Evergreen Wisteria
    • Evergreen Wisteria
    • Millettia reticulata
    • Not really “evergreen” as the common name says, but a fabulous vine for summer color. Intense purple, pea-like flowers are produced in July and August and have the fragrance of NeHi Grape!
  • Marsh Rattlesnake Master
    • Marsh Rattlesnake Master
    • Eryngium aquaticum
    • Apiaceae
    • Conservation Gardens
  • Miltonia spectabilis var. moreliana
    • Miltonia spectabilis var. moreliana
    • Orchidaceae
    • Orchid Display House
  • Monja Blanca
    • Monja Blanca
    • Lycaste skinneri
    • Orchid Display House
  • Plumleaf Native Azalea
    • Plumleaf Native Azalea
    • Rhododendron prunifolium
    • Ericaceae
    • Anne Cox Chambers Southern Seasons Garden
  • Rabbiteye Blueberry
    • Rabbiteye Blueberry
    • Vaccinium ashei ‘Tiftblue’
    • Ericaceae
    • Edible Garden

August

  • Dove Orchid
    • Dove Orchid
    • Peristeria elata
    • Orchidaceae
    • Orchid Display House
  • Fig
    • Fig
    • Ficus carica ‘LSU Gold’
    • Edible Garden
  • Ginger Lily
    • Ginger Lily
    • Hedychium coronarium ‘Kinkaku’
    • One of the many ginger lilies in our collection, this cultivar has pale yellow flowers flushed with salmon on four-foot stalks. It will bloom in sun to part shade and is a nice addition to the late summer perennial border.
  • Joe-Pye Weed
    • Joe-Pye Weed
    • Eupatorium purpureum ‘Joe White’
    • Asteraceae
    • Joe-Pye Weed is a tall perennial. It is often mistaken as a common roadside weed and undervalued for its ornamental attributes. When in bloom, it may attract swarms of butterflies looking to feed.
  • Phalaenopsis hieroglyphica
    • Phalaenopsis hieroglyphica
    • Orchidaceae
    • Orchid Display House
  • Water Lily
    • Water Lily
    • Nymphaea ‘Barbara Dobbins’
    • Nymphaeaceae
    • Aquatic Plant Pond

September

  • Beautyberry
    • Beautyberry
    • Callicarpa americana
    • A durable deciduous shrub prized for its shiny colorful clusters of small ornamental fruits which appear all along its stems in autumn. The fruits are a favorite food source for many birds. Many cultivars of Asian beautyberry species have been selected for fruit color, ranging from white to purple to pink.
  • Helianthus
    • Helianthus
    • Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’
    • Numerous pale yellow flowers burst open in late summer into fall. Naturally reaches 6 to 8 feet, but height can be controlled by cutting back by one-third in May.
  • Ironweed
    • Ironweed
    • Vernonia angustifolia
    • Asteraceae
    • Conservation Gardens
  • Ladies’ Tresses
    • Ladies’ Tresses
    • Spiranthes cernua
    • Orchidaceae
    • Beautiful white flowering native orchid that occurs in bog habitats.
  • Liberty Apple
    • Liberty Apple
    • Malus ‘Liberty’
    • Edible Garden
  • Orange Tea-Olive
    • Orange Tea-Olive
    • Osmanthus fragrans v. aurantiacus
    • The fragrance of this evergreen shrub perfumes the main entrance to the garden. This unusual, hard-to-find variety produces orange flowers instead of the typical white flowers. Blooms from September into October.

October

  • Autumn crocus
    • Autumn crocus
    • Colchicum autumnale
    • This fall-flowering crocus brightens the Crape Myrtle Allee with its purple-blue flowers. It can naturalize in the garden in either sun or part shade.
  • Dendrobium bullenianum
    • Dendrobium bullenianum
    • Orchidaceae
    • Orchid Display House
  • Mountain Sage
    • Mountain Sage
    • Salvia regla ‘Jame’
    • This western U.S. native is one of the many perennials that offer late season color to borders at the Atlanta Botanical Garden. Mountain Sage forms a three-foot wide shrub with shiny, heart-shaped leaves. Tubular, bright orange flowers attract hummingbirds to the fall garden. It is also very drought tolerant.
  • Perennial Mum
    • Perennial Mum
    • Chrysanthemum ‘Gethsemane Moonlight’
    • A stunning bounty of creamy yellow daisies that last until frost in full sun. This lush 2-3 foot tall and 4 foot wide perennial will dazzle in the late blooming season.
  • Pink Muhly
    • Pink Muhly
    • Muhlenbergia capillaris
    • Poaceae
    • Native grass with masses of breathtaking pink, wispy blooms.
  • Spider Orchid
    • Spider Orchid
    • Brassia longissima
    • Orchidaceae
    • Orchid Display House

November

  • Christmas Camellia
    • Christmas Camellia
    • Camellia sasanqua
    • The sasanquas are the smaller flowered of the camellias. But the beautiful white, pink or red flowers put on a late fall and early winter show in the Camellia Garden.
  • Cobb’s Dendrochilum
    • Cobb’s Dendrochilum
    • Dendrochilum cobbianum
    • Orchidaceae
    • Orchid Display House
  • Guzmania jaramilloi
    • Guzmania jaramilloi
    • Bromeliaceae
    • High Elevation House
  • Huntleya wallisii
    • Huntleya wallisii
    • Orchidaceae
    • Orchid Display House
  • Linden Viburnum
    • Linden Viburnum
    • Viburnum dilatatum ‘Erie’
    • Bright red fruit clusters put on a real show in the fall in the Children’s Garden. This deciduous viburnum, which reaches eight to 10 feet, produces white, flat-topped clusters of flowers in early summer.
  • Swan Orchid
    • Swan Orchid
    • Cycnoches cooperi
    • Orchidaceae
    • Orchid Display House

December

  • Aloe suprafoliata
    • Aloe suprafoliata
    • Aloaceae
    • Desert House
  • Golden Japanese Plum Yew
    • Golden Japanese Plum Yew
    • Cephalotaxus harringtonia ‘Ogon Gold’
    • The Golden Japanese Plum Yew has two-inch long needles with new growth of bright gold. It reaches five feet in height and grows in part shade. The conifers change with each season, offering a myriad of colors and textures for Atlanta gardens.
  • Laelia anceps
    • Laelia anceps
    • Orchidaceae
    • Orchid Display House
  • Paphiopedilum primulinum
    • Paphiopedilum primulinum
    • Orchidaceae
    • Orchid Display House
  • Starfish Flower
    • Starfish Flower
    • Stapelia gigantea
    • Asclepiadaceae
    • Desert House

Plant Hotline

Have a question about your plants or garden?

Contact the Plant Hotline and a Master Gardener will return your call or email with an answer.

Call 404-888-GROW (4769) or email planthotline@atlantabg.org with your plant questions. Please include your contact information.

Gardening Tips by Month

January

  • Prune summer-blooming shrubs: abelia, althea, peegee hydrangea, St. John’s wort, crape myrtle and chaste tree.
  • During dry periods, plant or transplant dormant trees and shrubs.
  • Cut back and clean up perennial borders and top dress with aged manure or compost.
  • Start cool-season veggies from seed to set out on Valentine’s Day.

February

  • Sow cool-season annuals in beds.
  • Cut back ornamental grasses and Liriope.
  • Plant and prune roses toward the end of the month; good varieties for Atlanta include: Mrs. Oakley Fischer, Knockout, and Old Blush.

March

  • Fertilize fescue lawns.
  • Divide and move perennials and groundcovers.
  • Root-prune difficult-to-move woody plants for fall transplanting.
  • Delay planting summer annuals until April.

April

  • Select native azaleas when in bloom early this month.
  • Finish pruning late-season flowering shrubs.
  • Stake perennials before they get too tall.
  • Plant tender summer bulbs late this month.

May

  • Sod or seed warm-season turfs such as Bermuda, Zoysia or Centipede.
  • Weed, then mulch to minimize re-growth of weeds and water loss.
  • Weed, fertilize, mulch and water your vegetable garden for big dividends later.
  • Separate and transplant hellebore seedlings and water-in thoroughly.

June

  • Keep annual flowers dead-headed.
  • Fertilize warm-season lawns.
  • Prune azaleas after flowering to improve the shape.
  • Divide early perennials that have finished blooming.
  • Discard spent biennials after scattering seed.

July

  • Plant water lilies and lotus in pots of heavy, rich clay soil and mulch with pebbles to keep pond water clean.
  • Aquatic plants are heavy feeders, so push fertilizer pellets into the soil bi-weekly.
  • Take greenwood cuttings of your best azaleas, forsythia and daphne.
  • Replenish organic mulch to slow water loss.

August

  • Order fall-blooming crocus and colchicum this month for blooms in October.
  • Start seeds of choice cultivars of pansies, foxgloves, and hollyhocks.
  • Set out transplants of broccoli, cabbage, and kale for fall harvests.
  • Prune and fertilize roses for the flush of bloom expected next month.
  • Divide iris and daylilies.

September

  • Remove spent annuals.
  • Reseed or sod fescue lawns.
  • Divide and replant spring and summer blooming perennials.
  • Test your garden soil, send to the Cooperative Extension Service in your county, then lime soils as required.
  • Container-grown, fall-blooming perennials such as aster, goldenrod and pineapple sage will add color to the autumn garden.

October

  • Divide and replant perennials.
  • Plant trees and woody ornamental shrubs.
  • Plant pansies now for color throughout fall and winter.
  • Plant spring-blooming bulbs.
  • Restore flower and vegetable gardens by digging in compost before replanting.

November

  • Dig and store tender bulbs and tubers.
  • Continue to plant trees and woody ornamentals.
  • Begin a compost pile with raked leaves.
  • This is the ideal planting time to plant balled and burlapped woody ornamentals.

December

  • Store hoses and cut off water to outside lines before a hard freeze.
  • Mulch all new plantings.
  • Add lime now for great vegetables next spring.
  • Cut back hardy perennials after frost and clean up perennial bed.